TV in Denmark


TV in Denmark is probably no better or worse than anywhere else in the world when it comes to programming. There is rarely anything on worth watching!

The biggest problem with Danish TV is that you need to have a TV license, and it is very expensive. At present (2014) it costs 2436 kroner per year to have a license. About $450/£270  per year.

Now you may say, “Fine, I don’t want a television license since I won't watch TV." Are you going to listen to the listen to the radio instead? You'll will need a license for that than!

Do you use a computer and have online access?

Does your phone have internet access, or is it capable of video?

Well, you need a TV (or Media) license called a TV licens.

So there really is no way to get around the cost of getting a TV license unless you do not own a TV, radio or computer.

You will be responsible to contact DR and tell them you need a TV license, if they do not contact you when you arrive. This needs to be done within 14 days of starting to view any type of broadcasts.

You will be issued a Privat Licens, which (2014 prices) costs 1218 kr every 6 months. If you only have a radio, you can get a radio only license for 160 kroner each 6 months. You can see the current prices. There are also licenses for business uses.

Please do not try to avoid paying for a license for watching tv in Denmark, because they do check and you will be fined heavily if you are found to be cheating.

Media license covers your TV, computers, radios, phones and other broadcasting devices in your home, car and summer home. Using a phone or computer outside your home is also okay and is not checked, but it is legal as long as you have a license.

A radio license only allows you to listen to your listen to the radio and not watch TV in Denmark.

What do you get?

For your money you do not get much!

1. The right to use your media equipment like TV, computer and phones to access any type of legal media. (there are some sites that the government has banned, like music download sites).

2. You will be able to see the following TV in Denmark stations: – DR1, DR K, DR HD, Ramasjang and DR update. These programs are mostly Danish shows, talk shows, documentaries, news and kids programs. Personally, I find little to watch or hold my interest on any of the above stations. You can learn more about each station at and www.dr.dk.

3. You also get access to all the radio programs in Denmark, be they run by the Danish government or independent stations. Many of the stations are now going DAB, so you won't be able to listen to them on conventional radios!

If you want other channels, like TV2 Zulu, TV2 Charlie, Discovery, BBC, etc., then you need to pay extra. You will have to buy a cable package or get satellite. All of a sudden, you are paying over 500 kroner a month for your television viewing privileges. And guess what – there are still commercials on many of the stations and the basic stations don’t often start programming until the afternoon or early evenings, and then they shut down before midnight.

You can view the days current tv in denmark programs here. You won’t get much bang for your buck in this system.

If you want cable tv, you can search for "kabel tv" on google.dk and see some of the services available. Some of the top services are TDC, YouSee, Boxer, Canal Digital, Telia, Viasat and Kabel Danmark. There are many more, some are localized and while others serve all of Denmark. Check around and talk to people, before deciding.

 If you want to watch TV programs in other countries try a VPN service like OverPlay, it is a proxy site, which allows you to watch programs from other countries on your computer. For example if you are in Denmark and want to watch CBS shows from America, OverPlay will encrypt your IP address to show that it is actually in the US, so you have access to the shows. You can do this in any country, so if you are in Saudi Arabia and you want to watch Danish television, you can. Simple to download, costs $10 per month and there are discounts for longer periods.

Remember if you do not have a license for your TV in Denmark, you are breaking the law and you will be fined.

If you need more information about getting a TV license, contact DR License at www.dr.dk or on Tlf: 3520 3040. 

Finding a provider

When trying to decide if there is any good tv in Denmark, you will have to check what the various providers can offer. Actually they are pretty much the same run of the mill .. it is just the prices that vary. There are so many different packages available from various companies like TDC, WAOO, Canal Digital, Telia, Viasat and many more. Since these offers change so rapidly, it is hard to give good advice on who is the best. TDC is probably the most popular, but also one of the most unpopular. But honestly, the differences among them are very small, so if you see a good offer jump on it and you can always switch later on.

The best advise I can give you, is when you get an offer you like, get it in writing and than check your first statement to make sure you got exactly what you asked for and at the right price. Some companies (especially TDC) love to add little additional things for "FREE" for a trial period and than suddenly you are paying a large fee for something you never ordered. (This is just from personal experience and talking with other people.)

There are lots of stealth taxes, which they never tell you about and not sure you can do much about them.

Many of the companies will have packages where you get TV, Internet and phone all in one package. Again, beware and research the best packages. Go to several shops and talk to the various providers.

A good idea is to go to the phone shops and stores that sell TV and see who they recommend. They often know of the best offers around and may even being doing a promotion with one of the providers.

Start with Telia and TDC and than you have an idea of what the main providers are offering and their costs.

Talk to other people and see who they like. Sometimes you are limited by your location, so it is important to do a bit of research before jumping on the first tv in Denmark offer you see. 




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