Riding the Copenhagen Metro in Denmark

Riding the Metro in Denmark is the easiest and quickest way from the airport to central Copenhagen. There are only lines on the Metro . The M1 and M2.

The M1 line goes back and forth from Vanløse to Vestamager, while the M2 line goes back and forth from Vanløse to Copenhagen Airport. They make 14 to 15 stops along their respective routes, each one does stop at Kongens Nytorv and Nørreport, which are central downtown locations.

Since the Metro runs without a driver (it is automatically driven) it runs 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. During the rushhour the metro runs every 2 to 4 minutes. The rest of the day it runs every 3 to 6 minutes. So you can see there is very little waiting time.

At night and on weekends the time between Metros can vary from 10 to 20 minutes depending on the line. But still that is not a very long wait.

At the airport the Metro for Copenhagen is located in Terminal 3. Just look for the sign that says METRO. Not hard to find.

Tickets: You will need tickets to ride the Metro. You can use the same tickets you use on the bus and train. A ticket to the airport from downtown costs 34.50 at present. (2011) and it covers 3 zones. Zone 4, 3 and 1. So you can ride all the way to Frederiksberg on the same ticket. If you travel beyond towards Vanløse you are entering Zone 2 and will have to buy a 4 zone ticket instead of the 3 zone.

Learn more about Zones and Tickets here.

Lots of people want to open the doors on the metro, but it is not necessary. The doors will open automatically and close automatically. Just wait behind the yellow line, so that you not get accidently hurt. When the Metro stops, the door opens up.

Make sure you have your ticket and get on and off at your stops. The best place to sit is up front, where you can look out the window and see the tunnel.

Watch the short video below and it gives you an idea of how a station looks and how to board and exit. The other videos below will also enlighten you on how the metro looks inside. Notice the signs above the escalator announcing the time of departures for each line.

Before taking the METRO in Denmark

Even though the Copenhagen metro is very convenient, be sure that it is the best choice for you. There is also the train which goes downtown. The cost is the same and it stops at the main train station, where the Metro does not. Plus if you going further than downtown, than the Metro in Denmark may be the wrong choice. See all the modes of transportation available to you in Denmark.

If you plan to continue your journey to Klampenborg or Køge, than the train is better for connections. You can connect at Nørreport, but that is really the only place on the Metro line that has possibility for an easy connection to all trains.

So plan wisely before choosing. Check with your hotel or the locale that you plan to head to. Ask them what is the best stop for you? What is the best travel option? A few simple questions can save you a lot of hassle and possibly money.


Generally speaking Denmark is a very safe country, but the metro and train stations are often hangouts for drunks and drug users, especially at night or when it is cold outside.

Most of the time, they stay to themselves, but there are times when they get a bit boisterous. The only staff you will encounter are ticket checkers and they rarely do anything about the drunks, drug addicts or other trouble makers.

Ask other people for help if anyone is around. There are also green and red buttons on the metro. Green is for general assistance and the red is for emergency help. Do not be afraid to use them if you feel that you are in danger. Better safe than sorry.

Try to always to avoid traveling alone, especially at night or on weekends. If you do just be vigilant. It really is rare that anything happens.

For more information on the Metro in Denmark, you can go to the Metro in Denmark homepage

Here are two fun videos of flash mobs on the Copenhagen Metro

and than there is this great one with the orchestra. That must have been a tough flash mob. Try playing flawlessly on a crowded metro! Well done!

History of the Copenhagen Metro

In October 2002, the metro in Denmark was officially opened in Copenhagen. There were 2 lines running from east to west. The novelty of the metro was that it is fully automated and has no conductor on board.

The first line ran from Nørreport (in Copenhagen) to Vestamager (on Amager) and was opened on October 19, 2002. The second line ran towards Lergravsparken.  Additional stations were added as the project progressed.

May 2003, they added Forum and Frederiksberg and later that year in October they added Vanløse and opened Flintholm in 2004.

The metro in Denmark reached the airport in September 2007.

More expansion is still going on and the completed project is scheduled for 2018, where the Meto will include the M3 and M4 lines.  This will be an inner circle line which will include stations like Kongens Nytorv, Østerport, Main Station, Nørrebro and link with the M1 and M2 lines making the whole system much more independant of DSB trains.

There is talk of more offshoots into areas like Gladsaxe to the north and southwest into the SV quarter.

 It now stretches for 21 kilometers with 22 stations (9 underground), runs 20 to 30m underground  for about 9 km, has 34 trains, seating capacity for 96 people and about 204 standing room places per train.

 A brief time line of the metro in Denmark completion dates.

19 Oct. 2002 - Nørreport - Vestamager - Lergravsparken
29 May 2003 - Nørreport - Frederiksberg
12 Oct 2003 - Frederiksberg - Vanløse
24 Jan 2004 - Flintholm
28 Sept 2007 - Lergravsparken - Lufthavnen

List of Metro Stations in Copenhagen Denmark

Amager Strand, Amagerbro. Bella Center, Christianshavn, DR Byen, Fasanvej, Femøren, Flintholm, Forum, Frederiksberg, Islands Brygge, Kastrup, Kongens Nytorv, Lergravsparken, Lindevang, Lufthavnen, Nørreport, Ørestad, Øresund, Sundby, Vanløse, Vestamager

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